My team run VSC in the browser and they are just fine - Part II

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Introduction In the first part of this series - I run VSC in the browser and I was just fine - I wrote many stupid things around the possibility of having a VSC server instance running inside AWS over a simple, immutable, ec2 instance. The template {that can be easily deployed by a Lambda function [that can be easily deployed behind a route53 record (that can be easily placed as the endpoint of a custom Slack action)]} let you start your IDE and code from wherever you would like to.


I run VSC in the browser and I am just fine - Part I

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Introduction Serverless and managed things are the best choices if you don’t want to deal with infrastructure (3 2 1: fight) buuuuut…even immutable things are not so bad for this purpose - at least, if they are immutable for real 🤣 Today I wanna talk about a useful way to run an instance(s) of VSC server in AWS and code from everywhere (yes, even your iPad): let’s start! This time I will go native: so no CDK, I’m sorry, but pure Cloudformation instead.


A serverless OCR with Polly and Rekognition unveils the power of stack inheritance in CDK

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Introduction In the last two weeks, I released a few CDK stacks: I made some experiments around API Gateway and service integration that came out in two serverless forms, the Contact Form and the Upload Form, read to be deployed in your static web page 😎. Actually, with CDK you can do so much more and so much more easily. The last stack I released - a producer-consumer chain presented here - it was a way I used to introduce how you can leverage Typescript inheritance to recycle an old stack and build on top of it.


SQS Extended: a serverless producer/consumer chain

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Introduction A few days ago I wrote about a simple stack that leverage API Gateway and Lambda-proxy integration to create a safe upload endpoint to let unknown users push inside a bucket of your choice. The stack I will present today is can be used to build a producer-consumer chain, by implementing the SQS Extended pattern you can find in AWS exams. For the most curious, here you can find the core code.


Build an upload form with 45 lines of Typescript

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Introduction The AWS CDK is becoming day by day pretty easy to use. I use Typescript, and today I will talk about a common use case: a simple Upload Endpoint for your API Gateway than like a LEGO can be built with a few instructions and of course…without the need of any server. For the most curious, here you can find the core code. Scenario You want to provide an endpoint to upload object: where?


How to deploy a serverless contact form with API Gateway, DynamoDB and SNS

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Introduction Hi everybody, thanks for the claps, it was a great month - rain rain rain again - now I’m back. The only GOOD THING of this terrible May is that AWS CDK came to simplify our life and I started using it (just a little) bit - still, enough to say, sincerely: it’s awesome. I used the Typescript version, everything is broken 2 release out of 3 but the time you save exploring the interfaces instead of looking for Cloudformation documentation online worths the time spending in troubleshooting the ongoing changes.


A Bugs Life: stories of a software engineer

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Disclaimer I’m on a train, back from Frankfurt - Germany, another of the cities to collect together with the ones I visited in this experience abroad in search of myself, trying to figure out who I am and who I want to be. Why this post and what to expect…Well, why, it’s simple: I recently studied a lot and got my AWS certifications (yuppie), I didn’t stop studying because I already planned other exams (really one of a bad idea of mine) and I also started to use my free time to go ahead with a couple of side-projects - they are super time-consuming.


From Cloudformation to CDK: the good, the bad and the evil

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Prelude As you know might be aware of, AWS has quite recently delivered - but it’s still in beta - the AWS Cloud Development Kit (CDK). Indeed, you should also know that I more recently migrated my blog to AWS as part of my migration strategy to the clouds - where my head already sits since 1991. Since I was using a Cloudformation stack though together with one of my colleagues, and since I did some manual changes to it - breaking the rules, I know - I decided it was a good moment to give a chance to CDK.


GraphQL is the new black

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Prelude GraphQL is an open-source data query and manipulation language for APIs and a runtime for fulfilling queries with existing data. GraphQL was developed internally by Facebook in 2012 before being publicly released in 2015 because - believe me or not - it was quite tricky for them dealing with their schema. It allows clients to define the structure of the data required, and exactly the same structure of the data is returned from the server, therefore preventing excessively large amounts of data from being returned.


A serverless blog using CodePipeline, s3 and CloudFront

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Goodbye old blog 😭😭 I disapperead for a while because as you should notice, first of all - I have a new domain. HAHA. It’s not the first one I own, but to be honest it’s the first time I use a domain for myself. So as I was saying yes, this post is about a migration. Morever, since this is the very first cross platform cross domain blog post - I want to share with you what I learnt and what is still missing, how I did what I did but mainly how someelse did what I didn’t.